Cogging Torque Analysis of a Permanent Magnet Machine in a Wind Turbine Finite element analysis is used to analyze the effects of different designs on the reduction of cogging torque. Permanent magnet machines are used in many industrial applications because of their ability to produce high power densities. The market for such machines has been expanding due to the availability of affordable magnet materials, technological improvements, and advances in design and control. While still a relatively new phenomenon in wind turbines, permanent magnet generators are increasingly the focus of R&D in that field.

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Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA’s Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays (reference NPO-47320) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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A System for Measuring the Sway of the Vehicle Assembly Building Tests have shown that the existing facility is safe. A system was developed to measure the sway of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center. This system was installed in the VAB and gathered more than one total year of data. The building movement was correlated with measurements provided by three wind towers in order to determine the maximum deflection of the building during high-wind events. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). A System for Measuring the Sway of the Vehicle Assembly Building (reference KSC-13773) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence An astrophysics instrument can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence (reference GSC-16686-1) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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Hydrometeor Size Distribution Measurements by Imaging the Attenuation of a Laser Spot Measurement of the DSD’s second moment is made by way of the Beer-Lambert law. The optical extinction of a laser due to scattering of particles is a well-known phenomenon. In a laboratory environment, this physical principle is known as the Beer-Lambert law, and is often used to measure the concentration of scattering particles in a fluid or gas. This method has been experimentally shown to be a usable means to measure the dust density from a rocket plume interaction with the lunar surface. Using the same principles and experimental arrangement, this technique can be applied to hydrometeor size distributions, and for launch-pad operations, specifically as a passive hail detection and measurement system. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). Hydrometeor Size Distribution Measurements by Imaging the Attenuation of a Laser Spot (reference KSC-13753) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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Victim Simulator for Victim Detection Radar This simulator can be placed for long periods of time in environments that would be unsafe for a human subject. Testing of victim detection radars has traditionally used human subjects who volunteer to be buried in, or climb into a space within, a rubble pile. This is not only uncomfortable, but can be hazardous or impractical when typical disaster scenarios are considered, including fire, mud, or liquid waste. Human subjects are also inconsistent from day to day (i.e., they do not have the same radar properties), so quantitative performance testing is difficult. Finally, testing a multiple-victim scenario is difficult and expensive because of the need for multiple human subjects who must all be coordinated. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). Victim Simulator for Victim Detection Radar (reference NPO-48793) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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Automated Lab-on-a-Chip Electrophoresis System Robotic analysis in defense or security operations that require sample handling or dilution can utilize this technology. Capillary electrophoresis is an analytical technique that can be used to detect and quantify extremely small amounts of various biological molecules. In the search for biochemical traces of life on other planets, part of this search involves an examination of amino acids, which are the building blocks of life on Earth. The most sensitive method for detecting amino acids is the use of laser induced fluorescence. However, since amino acids do not, in general, fluoresce, they first must be reacted with a fluorescent dye label prior to analysis. After this process is completed, the liquid sample then must be transported into the electrophoresis system. If the system is to be reused multiple times, samples must be added and removed each time. In typical laboratories, this process is performed manually by skilled human operators using standard laboratory equipment. This level of human intervention is not possible if this technology is to be implemented on extraterrestrial targets.

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A Mass-Spectrometer System for Detecting Gas Leaks This versatile, expandable system can be controlled from a safe remote location. The Hydrogen Umbilical Mass Spectrometer (HUMS) consists of an integrated sample delivery system, a commercial mass-spectrometer- based gas analyzer, and a set of calibration gas mixtures traceable to NIST (National Institute for Standards and Technology). The system, except for the calibration gas mixtures and the remote operator display, fits into a standard 24-in. wide, 6-ft high, 36-in. deep (0.61 by 1.83 by 0.91 m, respectively) equipment rack and is powered by 120-Vac, 30-A, 60-Hz source. It was designed to perform leak detection and measurement of cryogenic propellants (oxygen and hydrogen) from a remote location during shuttle-launch countdown. It is used specifically to sample the background gas surrounding the 17-in. (0.43-m) Orbiter-ET disconnect, looking for leakage of gaseous hydrogen. The capability to monitor shuttle purge gases and cryogenic hydrogen fill and drain line T-0 disconnect helium purge gas is incorporated into the shuttle installation on each Mobile Launch Platform (MLP). This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). A Mass-Spectometer System for Detecting Gas Leaks (reference KSC-1210906) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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Measuring Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop and Imaging Convection Within It Ordinary and laser-shadowgraph images yield valuable information. Figure 1 depicts an apparatus that simultaneously and synchronously records magnified ordinary top-view video images and laser-shadowgraph video images of a sessile drop. The real-time values of contact angle and rate of evaporation of the drop as functions of time can be calculated from the apparent diameters of the drop in the sequences of the images. In addition, the shadowgraphs contain flow patterns indicative of thermocapillary convection (if any) within the drop. These time-dependent parameters and flow patterns are important for understanding the physical processes involved in the spreading of evaporating liquids in such diverse technological applications as coating (including painting), film cooling, processing of materials, lubrication, and boiling. Study of the spreading of drops can also contribute to understanding of the spreading of biological cells. This Brief includes a Technical Support Package (TSP). Measuring Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop and Imaging Convection Within it (reference LEW-17075) is currently available for download from the TSP library. Please Login at the top of the page to download.  

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Simulating the Structural Behavior of Laminated Glass This report investigates the strength of archi- tectural laminated glass and the viability of its use for window glass in commercial buildings. Some researchers recommend that the structural behavior of laminated glass (typically consisting of two glass layers and a plasticized PVB [polyvinyl butyral] interlayer) is equivalent to the structural behavior of monolithic glass (one solid piece of glass) for most common applications. However, if this monolithic equivalency assumption is not valid, its implementation would result in the unconservative design and use of laminated glass, which could lead to failure of the glass at the design load. Using ALGOR Mechanical Event Simulation (MES) software, laminated and monolithic glass plates were modeled and analyzed to compare their response to a wind load. Stress results for the two plates were very different due to shear deformations experienced by the interlayer of the laminated plate. This research may help to ensure the safe use of laminated window glass.

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